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  • The second half of this animation has barely any frames since it’s just a lengthy scene of a parakeet throwing up, but the beginning is full of crazy fast body language and is a bit of a headache. 

    Basically, I’m going to finish the last half now so I have the rest of my time free for finessing Kul Nah Grah’s ducks and weaves. 


    Robb helped me finalise my script today, now I’m just scribbling up some more design bits and finishing the rough boards.

    I’m not sure if I’m good enough of a writer for it to gain any traction, but I’m glad that I’ve made it regardless.

    But come on, if i don’t find some sort of ‘success’ before 25 (my personally assigned deadline for breakthrough into an industry), I will be a sad, deflated mess.

    I actually also wanna get working on a illustrated kids book this year.
    Some of the best published illustration out there is in the form of charming, beautiful full bleed kids books. And I want in.

    I can do that via pitch, or crowd funding. The latter is next to impossible at the moment, but I do have connections with people who have had major success with that sort of thing, so who knows. 

    So I wanna make a cartoon…

    I am really pleased with what I am making here. I don’t know if Cartoon Hangover will care. But damn.

    I have effectively written a whole 5 minute, self contained story. 
    With a plot and jokes and fleshed out characters. Also I’ve designed most of the characters, though this isn’t imperative, I’m really only pitching the story.

    Hopefully even if it doesn’t get green lit to have it made into a short I can just throw it into my university submissions for grading points.

    I’ve never written anything with such well realised characters.

    I have also scoured the net for accounts of other people who have pitched (successes and rejections) to CH just to best gauge what to expect. 

    They don’t like people pitching without some sort of story board / beat board and don’t like people submitting with the intention of getting a series. These things are made to be self contained shorts and only the exceptional ones, so far ONLY Bee & Puppycat, get turned into series, and that is utterly dependant on viewer reception, as demonstrated through the series being funded entirely on Kickstarter.

    Still no idea what to do for my Nickelodeon pitch yet.
    Going to think about it more when this one is sent off and done.
    But having to come up with a series idea that features characters that are children/have a childlike mentality that is all round child friendly is kind of a challenge. Also, finding a theme to run with that hasn’t already been done to death. Funny how writing for kids can be so much harder. But also expected I guess. 

    I’m just excited. How amazing is it that we live in a time where I can write a cartoon and have it instantly seen by studio executives. WHAT.

    Creating a pitch for a cartoon. In a sentence:

    Rain Man with a slug and a bird.

    http://endshark.tumblr.com/post/72241026917/fraserbrown-endshark-hey-guys-this-has-been.

    fraserbrown:

    endshark:

    Hey guys, this has been a question that popped into my head last night and I’m not entirely sure of what the best way to express any of this is – and am generally pretty awful at explaining things I feel to other people in a capacity that really gets my point…

    I thought about all of this a lot this year, if I’m honest. 

    And don’t ever feel bad about posting all this personal jargen, because I really get a lot of the stuff you’ve been struggling with this past year (I had a really really low point creatively about this time last winter) and I just like knowing that you’re there, on another part of the world ,struggling with the same rubbish that I do.

    I just appreciate it, I guess. (Another reason why it’s good to be a vocal and present artist!) Gonna be a good year!

    endshark:

    Hey guys, this has been a question that popped into my head last night and I’m not entirely sure of what the best way to express any of this is – and am generally pretty awful at explaining things I feel to other people in a capacity that really gets my point across clearly. I proposed this question on to twitter earlier and got some nice responses but I am not entirely sure I did the best to truly represent what I was asking although the answers did make me think about this some more. I wasn’t sure if I was going to post this as well but I figure why not see how it goes. This isn’t over anything specific either and is more of a random train of thought!

    Read More

    At first when I read this I thought you were saying that just having that personal insight into an artists work somehow diminishes your enjoyment of their art. I thought that was a little odd, since in most cases, having a better understanding of the artist contextualises the art in completely new ways that often allow me a wider appreciation of their work in ways I wouldn’t have before.

    I of course then realised that you were speaking mainly of those with views or attitudes that you cannot support or abide: in which case I share in your struggle. I think it goes without saying, to most at least, that it can be difficult to love the art of someone who you disagree with on some personal level. Brilliant examples are people like Orson Scott Card (writer of Ender’s Game) a guy who is a very outspoken homophobe, but despite this has written amazing, critically acclaimed science fiction (that doesn’t even broach the subject). Lighter, though in some cases equally valid cases are say… Tom Cruise. He’s a scientologist, that is his belief system, but should it impede my enjoyment of his art?

    Ultimately I think that is a very personal choice: and not always one with a straight forward answer. If I had to say where I stood right now, I would urge everyone to judge the art and the artist separately, if possible. They often say that once created art belongs to the world, and in many senses that is true. I believe it should be allowed to transcend the creator and do what art does best, connect with people in deep and varied ways that the creator could not have even predicted. Nobody truly knows what will resonate with you, and we all know the feeling of seeing that one piece and suddenly feeling like it’s the most important thing to you in that moment. 

    That, in my opinion is why the ‘purity’ of art should not be sullied by the creator, however, art is being presented in increasingly ‘social’ methods. New pieces are found on sites like this and are often completely intertwined with expressed character of the artist. The expression becomes one in the same, often very hard to separate. Now let me just say, I think this has it’s merits, as I’m sure you do. 

    More often than not, the artist I discover here I love. They are often very well rounded and lovely people! I had oh so rarely ever had an experience contrary to this. I know it does happen, and I admit to often being unable to separate the two: but I think the important thing to realise as an artist, is that you are relevant

    Relating to my initial point, you are still alive, you are not a classic resigned to history, you are around, you are creating and you are accessible, and that is a wonderful thing. People will see your art without your pretext, and that’s great, but many people will seek out to see an artists personality: we are in an age of connection after all. And you said it yourself, Shark, it leads to networking and friends and amazing thing in general. 

    Yes, not everyone will like you, but withdrawing completely will mean a lot less people (and excuse me for the use of this word) love you. I mean that in the sense that this wonderful world wide medium allows for a connection beyond just face value art, and I think those possible connection are worth a lot more than just letting your art speak for itself.

    I don’t know. I guess, speaking to you personally, I would say to just not worry. Don’t seek out being aloof if you can help it. Nothing is more attractive in an artist that accessibility (if you ask me). One of the most inspiring things about this site is how we can imagine these fantastic creators as real, tangible people. And if that isn’t the very root of inspiration and good feelings, I don’t know what is.

    This is rambling and repetitive, but I hope it gives you some kind of insight. Don’t even think about going.

    robbbrown:

    fraserbrown:

    robbbrown:

    thinking about it, if I went into that room and it was fraz, I’d be disturbing him. if I went into that room and it was a burglar, I’d probably be dead right now so y’know what I made the right call by leaving whomever it was to it

    I am headphoned, I apologise. Hi Robb.

    you are forgiven now what shall we have for dinner

    Um, if we have the meat for it I could do meatballs?

    robbbrown:

    thinking about it, if I went into that room and it was fraz, I’d be disturbing him. if I went into that room and it was a burglar, I’d probably be dead right now so y’know what I made the right call by leaving whomever it was to it

    I am headphoned, I apologise. Hi Robb.

    Star Wars: Essential Guide to Droids.

    AH. This was like the best book. I don’t know where mine went. Probably in a car boot. 

    Santa, yes please.

    robbbrown:

to chaz a long day consists of uncreative selfies (topless, but I’ve saved you that horror) and playing hearthstone

The Onion:Thumb becomes self-aware. Doesn’t like  it.
    robbbrown:

to chaz a long day consists of uncreative selfies (topless, but I’ve saved you that horror) and playing hearthstone

The Onion:Thumb becomes self-aware. Doesn’t like  it.

    robbbrown:

    to chaz a long day consists of uncreative selfies (topless, but I’ve saved you that horror) and playing hearthstone

    The Onion:

    Thumb becomes self-aware. Doesn’t like it.

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